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Duck! Rabbit!

CRITICS HAVE SAID

  • With a strong, well-executed concept, this book provides an excellent starting point for discussing how points of view can differ and still be right.
    –School Library Journal

IF YOU LOVE THIS BOOK, THEN TRY:

  • Banyai, Istvan. Zoom. Viking, 1995.
  • Baum, Arline, and Joseph Baum. Opt: An Illusionary Tale. Viking, 1987.
  • Carle, Eric. Hello, Red Fox. Simon & Schuster, 1998.
  • Eastman, P. D. Are You My Mother? Random House, 1960.
  • Ernst, Lisa Campbell. The Turn-Around, Upside-Down Alphabet Book. Simon & Schuster, 2004.
  • Feiffer, Jules. Bark, George. HarperCollins, 1999.
  • Isol. It’s Useful to Have a Duck; It’s Useful to Have a Boy. Groundwood/House of Anasazi, 2009.
  • Jonas, Ann. Reflections. Greenwillow, 1987.
  • Jonas, Ann. Round Trip. Greenwillow, 1983.
  • Palatini, Margie. Moo Who? HarperCollins, 2004.
  • Portis, Antointette. Not a Box. HarperCollins, 2006.
  • Rash, Andy. Are You a Horse? Scholastic, 2008.
  • Rinck, Maranke. I Feel a Foot! Lemniscaat/Boyds Mills, 2008.
  • Rosenthal, Amy Krouse. Cookies: Bite-Size Life Lessons. HarperCollins, 2006.
  • Rosenthal, Amy Krouse. Little Hoot. Chronicle, 2008.
  • Rosenthal, Amy Krouse. Little Pea. Chronicle, 2005.
  • Rosenthal, Amy Krouse. Spoon. Hyperion, 2009.
  • Shaw, Charles Green. It Looked Like Spilt Milk. HarperCollins, 1991, c1947.
  • Van Allsburg, Chris. The Mysteries of Harris Burdick. Houghton Mifflin, 1984.
  • Werner, Sharon. Alphabeasties and Other Amazing Types. Blue Apple, 2009.
  • Wick, Walter. Walter Wick’s Optical Tricks. Scholastic, 1998.
  • Young, Ed. Seven Blind Mice. Philomel, 1992.